IRMS005 – Barclay T. Blair on big data, information governance and records management

In this podcast Barclay T.Blair  compares and contrasts:

  • the big data view (that all data is valuable, and the more the better)
  • the information governance view (that some data is good, but other types of data have risks, costs and constraints attached to them that outweigh their potential value)

Barclay discusses with James Lappin:

  • the divide between structured data (in relational databases/Hadoop databases) and unstructured data (documents and e-mail)
  • the continuing need for classification of content – to apply retention, to identify content that needs extra protection (for example to meet privacy concerns), and to meet specific regulatory requirements
  • the impact of auto-classifications on the nature of classifications themselves
  • the challenges of training auto-classification engines
  • the possibility of having auto-classification tools that are trained to classify the content specific to a particular industry sector
  • the similarities and differences between using auto-classification in an e-Discovery context and in an information governance context
  • the US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) initiatives on archiving e-mail (Capstone) and on encouraging automation
  • the challenges to existing records management and archives theory posed by automated approaches to records management
  • the extent to which courts and the legal process are increasing the transparency of auto-classification
  • the implications of the fact that auto-classification engines make decisions based on complex mathematical techniques that whilst being statistically sound, and academically verified, are not understood by non-mathematicians

The podcast is introduced by Heather Jack.

The conversation between Barclay T.Blair and James Lappin was recorded on October 16 2013.

This podcast is 46 minutes long.

You can play the podcast in your browser with this player:  (needs flash or html 5)

 

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IRMS004-Cheryl McKinnon on new kinds of records management tools

In this podcast Forrester analyst Cheryl McKinnon comments on new developments in the market place around records management.

In the podcast Cheryl discusses:

  • The call by the US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for the technology industry to help develop automated solutions to records management.
  • Innovations coming out of the eDiscovery space and the e-mail archiving space as vendors in both those markets seek to move into the information governance space
  • The opportunities and challenges of applying tools/techniques such as predictive coding,  autoclassification and analytics to records management
  • The impact of big data on retention policies

Cheryl McKinnon is Principal analyst for Forrester, specialising in records management, information governance, and eDiscovery

The conversation between Cheryl McKinnon and James Lappin took place on 26 September 2013.

The podcast is introduced by Heather Jack

This podcast is 30 minutes long.

Links

You can play the podcast in your browser with this player:  (needs flash or html 5)

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/irmspodcast/Episode004-CherylMcKinnon.mp3 ]

 

 

 

IRMS003 – Hugh Hagan on the Public Records (Scotland) Act 2011

The Public Records (Scotland) Act 2011 (PRSA) received Royal Assent on 20 April 2011 and came into force in January 2013. It is the first new public records legislation in Scotland for over 70 years.

Hugh Hagan is Senior Public Records Officer with the National Records of Scotland – the leaders and regulators of Scottish public records legislation. He and his team won the IRMS Records Management Team of the Year in 2013.

In this discussion Hugh discusses –

  • the compelling story that prompted the Act – The PRSA fulfils one of the main recommendations of the Shaw report which documented the findings of an independent review of the systems in place to protect children and keep them safe in residential care.  The review was  prompted by allegations of systemic child abuse, and covered the period between 1950 and 1995.  The Shaw Report found that poor record keeping often created difficulties for former residents of residential schools and children’s homes, when they attempted to trace their records for identity, family or medical reasons.  The Report recommended that “the government should commission a review of public records legislation which should lead to new legislation being drafted to meet records and information needs in Scotland”
  • records management plans –  the Act requires public authorities to submit   both a records management plan, and  supporting evidence that shows how they are implementing the plan.  They are encouraged to publish both the plan and, where possible,  the supporting evidence.   These plans look set  to provide an ever-growing knowledge base of good practice to organisations both public and private in Scotland and beyond.  Examples already published include NHS Fife and Falkirk Council .
  • the uniqueness of the legislation –  the Act covers not just of the records directly managed by Scottish public authorities governed by the Act but of third party organisations delivering functions on behalf of those authorities

The conversation between  Heather Jack and Hugh Hagan took place in September 2013.

The podcast is introduced by your hosts Heather Jack and James Lappin

The podcast is 47 minutes long.

You can play the podcast in your browser with this player:  (needs flash or html 5)

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/irmspodcast/IRMS_003-HughHagen.mp3 ]

IRMS002-Paul Gibbons (FOI man) on the use of private e-mail accounts in UK government

Paul Gibbons is a Freedom of Information practitioner, and author of the  FOI Man blog.  He is @FoimanUK  on twitter.

In this discussion Paul discusses recent FOI case law around the use of private e-mail accounts by ministers and political staff in UK government.

Paul  discusses:

  • the Mrs Blurt case – where the Information Commissioner Christopher Graham ruled that e-mails sent by Education Secretary Michael Gove from a private account should be subject to the Freedom of Information Act
  • the ‘subtle differences’ between the guidance issued by the Information Commissioner and that of the Cabinet Office on the use of private e-mail accounts
  • the records management implications of the use of private e-mail accounts

The conversation between  James Lappin and Paul Gibbons took place on 23 September 2013.
The podcast is 20 minutes long.

The podcast is introduced by your hosts Heather Jack and James Lappin

List of things mentioned in the interview:

  • The ‘Mrs Blurt‘  case
  • Information Commissioner’s Guidance on official information held in private e-mail accounts

You can play the podcast in your browser with this player:  (needs flash or html 5)

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/irmspodcast/IRMS002-PaulGibbons.mp3 ]

IRMS 001 – Chris Walker on auto-classification and on e-mail

Chris Walker is an independent information governance consultant based in Canada, who has previously worked in the enterprise content management space for Open Text and Oracle.    He writes the Info Mgt Nuggets blog.

In this discussion  Chris gives his perspective on auto-classification.   He differentiates between:

  • auto-classification in an eDiscovery context where organisations are seeking to identify documents responsive to a particular case
  • auto-classification in an enterprise content management system (ECM) context where the   ECM repostitory is ingesting content from other repositories (shared drives. line of business systems, ERP systems etc.) and is attributing an appropriate category/classification to that content.

The interview concludes with a discussion on filtering trivial and personal e-mails from e-mail accounts

The conversation between  James Lappin and Chris Walker took place in September 2013.

The podcast is introduced by your hosts Heather Jack and James Lappin

Links to things mentioned in the interview:

You can play the podcast in your browser with this player:  (needs flash or html 5)

Or you can download the podcast from here: